World War II As It Happened
A MaritimeQuest Daily Event Special Presentation
Saturday, July 19, 1941
Day 688

July 19, 1941: Front page of the Nottingham Evening Post, Nottingham, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in columns 2-3: "Blenheim's Fine Record - 300,000 Tons Of Shipping Sunk In Four Months"
(I could, if I had the time, calculate the German merchant ship losses for the last four months, but I don't have the time. I will say, I have my doubts that the actual number is anything close to this.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of The Daily Mail, Hull, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of the Evening Despatch, Birmingham, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of The Evening News And Southern Daily Mail, Portsmouth and Southsea, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of the Western Mail and South Wales News, Cardiff, Wales.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report at top left: "Submarines Sink 7 Nazi Transports"
(The report probably refers to an action by HMS Torbay, under the command of Lt. Commander Anthony C. C. Miers, RN. What the British report does not say is that Miers had his men shoot German soldiers in the water and in small craft after sinking their vessels. Exactly how many were killed is not known to me. This happened on at least three occasions between July 4 and 10.

The Germans equated this to the Baralong Incident of the Great War when the Q-Ship, HMS Baralong, sank SMS U-27 then shot all the survivors in the water. None of the thirty-seven-man crew survived. A second incident involving HMS Baralong occurred when the Q-Ship sank SMS U-41. While the survivors were not shot, a lifeboat with survivors was run down by the ship. There were only two survivors from the thirty-seven man crew.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of the Press and Journal, Aberdeen, Scotland.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of The Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 1: "Hitler Acted to Save Goering"
(Another report based on Russian propaganda and nothing else.)
Also note the report at bottom center: "Lindbergh Seeks Apology, Is Told To Return German Decoration"


July 19, 1941: Front page of The Sydney Sun, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in columns 5-6: "Panzer Leader Reported Killed"
(The Stockholm correspondent for the Daily Telegraph, reports the rumor [referred to as “persistent reports”] that Generaloberst Heinz Guderian had been killed in Russia. Another false report based on a rumor. Unknown to the press, Guderian had just been awarded the Eichenlaub (Oak Leaves) to his Ritterkreuz (Knight's Cross.) The announcement is in the Völkischer Beobachter below. He was not dead, injured or even inconvenienced. But the press at that time would print anything that they thought the public might like to hear and a dead Nazi General was good news to the public. Whether it was true or not.)
Also note the report at top right: "Moscow Radio Reports: Collapse Of Hitler: Berlin Reply"
(Radio Moscow claims that “informed circles in Berne” (Switzerland) are reporting that Adolf Hitler had collapsed of an epileptic seizure at his headquarters at Berchtesgarden. I don't believe that this was true. To the best of my knowledge, Hitler did not have epilepsy. You have to consider the source when reading this report.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of The News, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 3: "Goering Praises Airmen - May Be Nazi Ruse"


July 19, 1941: Front page of The Lethbridge Herald, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.
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July 19, 1941: Front page of the Winnipeg Free Press, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 6: "Infantile Paralysis Cases Now 38"
(Another 13 cases of polio reported in the Winnipeg area.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of the Biddeford Daily Journal, Biddeford, Maine.
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July 19, 1941: Front page of The Evening Star, Washington, D.C.
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Note the report in columns 6-7: "Nazis Risked Bismarck at Sea, Thinking Battleship Unsinkable"


July 19, 1941: Front page of The Evening Gazette, Xenia, Ohio.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of The San Antonio Light, San Antonio, Texas.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in columns 6-7: "Mexico Refuses Metal to Japan"


July 19, 1941: Front page of The Nevada State Journal, Reno, Nevada.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of The Bakersfield Californian, Bakersfield, California.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of the Teltower Kreisblatt, Kreis Teltow, Brandenburg, Germany.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
1. Das zäh verteidigte Smolensk genommen. Durchbruch durch Stalinlinnie zwischen Mogilew und Witebtk erweitert.
(Taken the tough defended Smolensk. Breakthrough extended through Stalinlinnie between Mogilev and Vitebk.)


July 19, 1941: Front page of the Völkischer Beobachter, the official newspaper of the NSDAP.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
1. Roosevelts Kampf um das Weltausbeutungsmonopol.
(Roosevelt's fight for the world monopoly of exploitation.)
2. Der Führer ehrt die Kretakämpfer.
(The Führer honors the Crete fighters.)
3. Versorgungshafen Hull wieder schwer getroffen.
(Supply harbor of Hull hit hard again.)
4. Siegreiche Luftkämpfe bei Malta.
(Victorious dogfights near Malta.)
[Note the photos at top left. Three Generals are awarded the Eichenlaub (Oak Leaves) to their Ritterkreuz (Knight's Cross.) From left to right: General der Infanterie Hermann Hoth, Generalleutnant Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen and Generaloberst Heinz Guderian. Hoth was convicted of war crimes and crimes against humanity for his activities in Russia and sentenced to 15 years in prison, but was released in 1954. He died in 1971. Richthofen, a cousin to Manfred [The red Baron] died of a brain tumor on July 12, 1945. Guderian, reported to be dead in the Sydney Sun above, probably should have been convicted as a war criminal, but because of a lack of direct evidence, he was never charged. He actually joined the U.S. Army Historical Division while in U.S. custody and was released from custody in 1948. Guderian died, not ever completely denouncing Nazism, in 1954.)



   
Page published July 19, 2022