World War II As It Happened
A MaritimeQuest Daily Event Special Presentation
Friday, July 18, 1941
Day 687

July 18, 1941: Front page of the Nottingham Evening Post, Nottingham, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the photo at bottom: "Still On Top With Her Job"
(HMS Ark Royal seen during aircraft operations.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Daily Mail, Hull, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of the Evening Despatch, Birmingham, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report at top left: "We Shall protect those ships'-Hopkins"
(Harry Hopkins, yesterday reported as missing in the Aberdeen paper, alive and well in London.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Evening News And Southern Daily Mail, Portsmouth and Southsea, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 5: "1,000th Bomber Leaves U.S."
(The 1,000th Hudson bomber leaves Los Angeles for England.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of the Western Mail and South Wales News, Cardiff, Wales.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of the Press and Journal, Aberdeen, Scotland.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 6: "Naval Auxiliary Sunk"
(HMS Lady Somers, a former Canadian passenger liner and former Armed Merchant Cruiser, now an ocean boarding vessel, was sunk by the Italian submarine Morosini on July 15. All 175 on board were rescued.)
Also note the report in column 1: "Goering Under House Arrest"
(The Press and Journal, has information from “well-informed circles,” which appears to be radio Moscow, that claims Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring is under house arrest, perhaps placed there by Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler or the Gestapo. The report, if it came from Russia, is nothing more than Russian propaganda.)

I also noticed that There is no retraction, at least on the front page, about yesterday's report that President Roosevelt's personal representative, Harry Hopkins, was not missing, but was in fact, in London. See the Evening Despatch above. )


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Sydney Sun, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Telegraph, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Lethbridge Herald, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of the Winnipeg Free Press, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the photo at top right: "Big Guns Guard Convoy"
(Photo of HMS King George V during a convoy escort voyage.)
 
Also note the report at bottom right: "4 More Infantile Paralysis Cases"
(Also known as polio, there are now 27 reported cases in Winnipeg.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of the Biddeford Daily Journal, Biddeford, Maine.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 7: "Sub That Sank Robin Moor Believed French"
(Some of the survivors believe that the submarine that sank their ship was built in France, but crewed by Germans. This was half true, the boat, U-69, was built in Kiel, Germany and the crew were all Germans.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Evening Star, Washington, D.C.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 3: "Troop-Laden Nazi Convoy Sunk by Subs, British Say"
(The report probably refers to an action by HMS Torbay, under the command of Lt. Commander Anthony C. C. Miers, RN. What the British report does not say is that Miers had his men shoot German soldiers in the water and in small craft after sinking their vessels. Exactly how many were killed is not known to me. This happened on at least three occasions between July 4 and 10.

The Germans equated this to the Baralong Incident of the Great War when the Q-Ship, HMS Baralong, sank SMS U-27 then shot all the survivors in the water. None of the thirty-seven-man crew survived. A second incident involving HMS Baralong occurred when the Q-Ship sank SMS U-41. While the survivors were not shot, a lifeboat with survivors was run down by the ship. There were only two survivors from the thirty-seven man crew.)
 
Also note the report in column 3: "President Says Press Gets His Lindbergh Mail"
(A response from President Roosevelt to Charles Lindbergh's asking for an apology yesterday.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Evening Gazette, Xenia, Ohio.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Port Arthur News, Port Arthur, Texas.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Nevada State Journal, Reno, Nevada.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 2: "Vinson Suggests Japanese At Hawaii Be Segregated"
(Democrat of Georgia and chairman of the House Naval Affairs Committee, Carl Vinson, suggests segregating the Japanese at Hawaii. This would later lead to the internment of Japanese and Japanese-American citizens.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of The Southern Jewish Weekly, Jacksonville, Florida.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report at top right: "Thousands of Jews Killed in German-Soviet War"
(Before the war was finished, the number would be millions.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of the San Mateo Times, San Mateo, California.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of the Teltower Kreisblatt, Kreis Teltow, Brandenburg, Germany.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
1. Neun Millionen ringen an der Ostfront um die Entscheidung. Die letzten Sowjet-Reserven eingesetzt - Große deutsche Erfolge bahnen sich an - Führer ehrt die Helden von Kreta.
(Nine million are struggling to make a decision on the eastern front. The last Soviet reserves deployed - Great German successes are in the offing - Führer honors the heroes of Crete.)


July 18, 1941: Front page of the Völkischer Beobachter, the official newspaper of the NSDAP.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
1. Neun Millionen kämpfen um die Entscheidung. Einsatz der letzten Sowjetreserven.
(Nine million fight for the decision. Use of the last Soviet reserves.)
2. Das Blutkellersystem bei der Truppe. GPU. jetzt unbeschränkter Herr des Sowjetheeres.
(The blood cellar system in the troops. GPU. now unrestricted master of the Soviet Army.)
3. Das Eichenlaub mit Schwertern und Brillanten.
(The oak leaves with swords and diamonds.)
[Adolf Hitler awarded Oberst Werner Mölders the diamonds to his Knight's Cross. Mölders thus became the first man to be awarded the Eichenlaub mit Schwertern und Brillanten zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuz [Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds] in the Second World War. Only 26 others would receive this award. He had recently been in the news for besting the record of Manfred von Richthofen, “The Red Baron,” from the Great War. However, his glory would last only a short time, Mölders, while flying as a passenger to the funeral of his friend Ernst Udet, was killed on Nov. 22, 1941 in a plane crash. They were buried side by side next to Manfred von Richthofen in the Invalidenfriedhof Cemetery in Berlin.

In 1969 the new German navy, the Deutsche Marine, named a destroyer in his honor. Mölders D-186, is one of only three German ships named after former Nazi officers.

The others, Lütjens D-185, named after Vizeadmiral Günther Lütjens, who died in the battleship Bismarck on May 24, 1941 and Rommel D-187, named after Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel, "The Desert Fox", who committed suicide on Oct. 14, 1944 after being accused of complicity in the July 20, 1944 plot to kill Adolf Hitler, (Operation Valkyrie.) This accusation has never been fully proven or fully disproved.]



   
Page published July 18, 2022