World War II As It Happened
A MaritimeQuest Daily Event Special Presentation
Saturday, January 17, 1942
Day 870

January 17, 1942: Front page of the News and Chronicle, London, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 4: "Goebbels on What Churchill Can Do"
Also note the report in columns 7-8: "Prices Of Sweets And Chocolate Now Controlled"


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Daily Mail, Hull, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the photo at bottom: "Former Hull Vessel"
(The Admiralty announces the loss of HM Trawler Lady Shirley. Famed for having sunk U-111 on Oct. 4, 1941, the boat was sunk by U-374 on Dec. 11, 1941. There were no survivors from the 33-man crew.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Mercury, Leeds, England.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of the Western Mail and South Wales News, Cardiff, Wales.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of the Post and Journal, Aberdeen, Scotland.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 6: "Japanese Are Using Gas"
(The Japanese were the only belligerent country to use poison gas in combat in World War II, this was mostly, but not exclusively, against Chinese troops. In this case, however, I don't think there had been a gas attack.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Sydney Sun, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in columns 3-4: "Five Japanese Transports Sunk By U.S.A."
(The claim is that the U.S. Navy has sunk a total of 24 warships and merchantmen since the beginning of the war. Including a 17,000-ton passenger ship. None of the claims were true. A post-war assessment shows that the Japanese lost 14 warships [including submarines] and 19 merchantmen from Dec. 7, 1941 to Jan. 12, 1942. United States forces were responsible for sinking only thirteen of these ships.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Telegraph, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Lethbridge Herald, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of the Winnipeg Free Press, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of the Biddeford Daily Journal, Biddeford, Maine.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Evening Star, Washington, D.C.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the headline report: "All 22 Found Dead In Lombard Plane"
(Actress Carole Lombard, the wife of Clark Gable, her mother, one of Clark Gable's press agents, 15 U.S. Army servicemen, one female passenger and 3 crew members of the aircraft all died when it flew into a mountain outside of Las Vegas. Lombard was on a war bonds tour for the U.S. Government. It was later determined that the crash was caused by the absurd policy of shutting down the safety beacons because of the fear of air attack by the Japanese. Looking back one can see how insane the thought of the Japanese conducting an air raid on Nevada was, but the people in charge could not. They were in a major cover-your-rear end mode and nothing, no matter how ridiculous it was, had been taken off the table. You can look at the modern-day equivalent in the overreaction to the COVID epidemic. Any official could come up with any insane policy, in the name of "public safety" and it would be implemented. The destruction wrought by these policies is incalculable, but we are all paying for it still today.)
[Full list of dead on front page of The Port Arthur News and The Bakersfield Californian below.]
 
Also note the report in column 3: "Gen. Von Reichenau Dead of Apoplexy, Berlin Reports"
(The report of his death was true, but the cause is still unknown. Generalfeldmarschall Walther von Reichenau had a stroke on Jan. 14th and was being flown to Leipzig for treatment. His plane crash-landed and he received further injuries. It is unclear if he died from the effects of the stroke or the plane crash. His early death prevented him from being tried as a war criminal at Nürnberg, charges for which he very likely would have been executed. A rabid Jew hater and devoted Nazi, Reichenau oversaw the Kiev area where the Babi Yar massacre took place in Sept. of 1941. He was indicted at Nürnberg, even though he was dead, as part of the German General Staff and him specifically for the Reichenau Order, also known as the severity order.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Evening Gazette, Xenia, Ohio.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Port Arthur News, Port Arthur, Texas.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Helena Independent, Helena, Montana.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the photo at top: "Score One For U.S. - Huge Japanese Liner Sunk"
(It was true that the passenger ship Yawata Maru was converted into an escort carrier named Unyo, but it was not sunk until Sept. 16, 1944.)
Also note the report in columns 3-4: "Tanker Coimbra Sunk in Sight of Shore; Crew's Fate Uncertain"
(Coimbra was sunk by U-123 on Jan. 15 with the loss of 36 men, there were only 10 survivors.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of The Bakersfield Californian, Bakersfield, California.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of the Teltower Kreisblatt, Kreis Teltow, Brandenburg, Germany.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
1. Große Verluste sowjetischer Kavallerie - Luftangriffe auf Alexandrien und englische hochöfen.
(Great losses of Soviet cavalry - air raids on Alexandria and English blast furnaces.)
2. Japanische Panzer vernichten britsche Fluchtkolonnen.
(Japanese tanks annihilate British escape columns.)


January 17, 1942: Front page of the Völkischer Beobachter, the official newspaper of the NSDAP.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
1. Schiffsverluste in Ostasien bedrohen Englands Strategie - 363.000 BRT. britisch-amerikanische Tonnage ausgeschaltet.
(Ship losses in East Asia threaten England's strategy - 363,000 GRT. British-American tonnage eliminated.)
2. Als fünftem Offizier der deutschen Wehrmacht Eichenlaub mit Schwertern für Kretschmer.
(As the fifth officer of the German Armed Forces Oak Leaves with Swords for Kretschmer.)
[Korvettenkapitän Otto Kretschmer, commanding officer of U-99, awarded the swords to his Ritterkreuz. He was the 6th officer to receive the Eichenlaub [Oak Leaves, awarded Nov. 4, 1940] and the 5th officer to receive the swords.

Kretschmer would become the top U-boat commander of World War II, sinking 46 ships for over 270,000 tons. Which makes him the second highest scoring submarine commander in history. Kapitänleutnant (later Vizeadmiral) Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière sank 195 ships for an astonishing 455,000 tons during the Great War. Kretschmer may have caught him by tonnage had he had been at sea longer. He did all his damage in only a year and a half from Oct. 1939 to Mar. 1941. (The second highest scoring U-boat commander of World War II was Wolfgang Lüth, who sank 47 ships for a total of over 225,000 tons, but it took him 47 months to accomplish that.) In Mar. 1941 he was captured when his U-99 was sunk and he remained a prisoner of war until 1947. After the war he joined the Bundesmarine and retired as a Flotillenadmiral. Otto Kretschmer died in 1998.]
[See "Kapitänleutnant Kretschmer versenkte 217.198 BRT." in the Völkischer Beobachter of Nov. 5, 1940.]



   
Page published January 17, 2023