World War II As It Happened
A MaritimeQuest Daily Event Special Presentation
Friday, March 22, 1940
(Good Friday)
Day 204

March 22, 1940: Front page of the Press and Journal, Aberdeen, Scotland.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 5: "16,700 Finns Killed In War"
(It is now believed that about 25,000 Finns were killed or missing in the "Winter War" with Russia. The Russians are believed to have lost as many as 167,000 men.)


March 22, 1940: Front page of the Evening Telegraph and Post, Dundee, Scotland.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


March 22, 1940: Front page of The Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 4: "Merchant Navy Heroes - Honours Conferred by King"


March 22, 1940: Front page of the Daily Telegraph, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


March 22, 1940: Front page of The Winnipeg Tribune, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


March 22, 1940: Front page of Haarlem's Dagblad, Haarlem, Netherlands.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


March 22, 1940: Front page of The Brainerd Daily Dispatch, Brainerd, Minnesota.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 3: "-12 Sets New March Low For Region"
 
Also note the report at bottom right: "Girl in 3-Year Mystery Sleep"
(The girl, Mary Ellen Reardon, was the victim of lethargic encephalitis, also known as sleeping sickness. The 1990 movie Awakenings, starring Robin Williams, was based on people who had this type of illness. In reality Dr. Oliver Sack studied people in the 1960's who had been "sleeping" since an encephalitis epidemic between 1917 and 1928. Mary remained in this condition until her death at age 25 on July 17, 1961.)
 
Excerpt from a Apr. 9, 1991 Washington Post article by Robin Herman;
"...no cure or treatment was found for the type of sleeping illness portrayed in "Awakenings." The virus that caused lethargic encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain, was never clearly identified. During the this epidemic, which occurred at the same time as the Great Flu Pandemic of 1918, the illness struck between 5 million and 10 million people worldwide, killing half of them fairly quickly. Many of the sleeping-sickness survivors seemed to recover fully, only to be incapacitated years later by a paralyzing Parkinson's-like syndrome. Curiously, tissue from the encephalitis patients never showed evidence that they had had the flu. Epidemiologists still cannot say whether the two epidemics were connected.'

After conducting some basic research on line, I have found no information that indicates that a cure or effective treatment has yet to be found.
 
Mary Ellen Reardon seen on June 19, 1939.


March 22, 1940: Front page of the Syracuse Herald-Journal, Syracuse, New York.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
 
Note the report in column 4: "Raid Damage At Sylt Small, Writer Finds"
[The report is concluded here.]
(This report in in line with the German assessment of the damage.)


March 22, 1940: Front page of The Vidette-Messenger, Valparaiso, Indiana.
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March 22, 1940: Front page of the Biddeford Daily Journal, Biddeford, Maine.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


March 22, 1940: Front page of The Kingsport Times, Kingsport, Tennessee.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)


March 22, 1940: The Oelwein Daily Register, Oelwein, Oelwein, Iowa.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)
Note the report in column 3: "Murderer Gets 4 Life Terms"
(The sentence for Laurel H. Crawford, who was convicted of killing his wife and three children by sending them over a cliff in a car in Dec. 1939.) He also killed a neighbor, but was not prosecuted for that crime.)
 
[Laurel H. Crawford died in May of 1971 after being beaten by inmates at Folsom Prison.]


March 22, 1940: Installment #17 of "The Story of Democracy" by Hendrik Willem van Loon as published in The Evening Gazette, Xenia, Ohio.
(Click on the image for a readable version.)



   
Page published March 22, 2021