Mystery Ships

Photos on this page require identification, if you can help please email the webmaster.
Above, two photos of an unidentified U-boat alongside a wrecked steamer. On the back of the photos it says wrecks near Eastbourne 1912. That date seem rather unlikely.

1.
Apr. 15, 2013
I have confirmed BR = Borea. The exact same image is shown in Jane's Fighting Ships of WWII.

Philip J. Heydon, I.S.M.

2.
Apr. 15, 2013
Italian destroyer BOREA (1927) same photo is in 1942 Jane's.

Barry Lake


Royal Navy Sloop?

1.
Apr. 15, 2013
One of the Grimsby class --they varied a bit. Photo is in the 1930s with the white and buff.

Barry Lake

2.
Apr. 15, 2013
Not easy to identify actual vessel but certainly one of the 'Grimsby' class escort vessels. Class on 6 consisting of the following: Grimsby, Leith, Lowestoft, Wallington, Londonderry, Deptford. The short size of the name letters attached to the hull suggests only HMS Leith.

Philip J. Heydon, I.S.M.



Nov. 7, 2012

I'm sending You a photo of the French destroyer, but I'm not sure which one it is.  As I am not familiar with French pennant number in the 1918-1939 period, I don't know if more than one ship has the certain number, in this case number "8".  Somewhere I have seen the destroyer with this "8" and it was written that this is "Guepard" and on the other occasion it was written "Panthere". This photo was taken in 1929 in Boka Kotorska bay (now in Montenegro), but then one of the main bases of Yugoslav Royal Navy.

Cheers
Vladimir Tarnovski

Reply 1.
Nov. 9, 2012

This says she is Vauquelin too (she had #8 at first) So that mystery photo must have been 1934 or later.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauquelin_class_destroyer

Regards,
Barry Lake

Reply 2.
Nov. 12, 2012

Further research suggests this is Guépard of the Guépard class. The photo has a copyright from the studio (not shown in the photo above) dated 1929. Guépard matched the photo above and is the only one of the class that was active in 1929.

Vladimir Tarnovski & Michael Pocock

 
An unidentified British or Canadian (Corvette?) seen in 1943-44. It appears that another ship is alongside showing the small funnel aft.

Reply 1
Sept. 26, 2012

She is HMCS Prince David, a former passenger ship converted for wartime. Below is another photo of her as a landing ship from Wikipedia.

Barry Lake

 
 
A very difficult ship to ID, a CAM ship seen on the Clyde June 5, 1941.

Reply 1
Nov. 5, 2012

She is not a CAM Ship. These are a very rare photos of HMS Ariguani one of the FSC (Fighter Catapult Ship).
The aircraft in the catapult is a Fulmar. She initally carried 2 Fulmars, then Sea Hurricanes. She made 3 operational launches that resulted in 1 interception.

Best regards,
José Antonio Veiga NOvegil
Cadiz, Spain

 
An unidentified Hospital Ship, No. 3 on the hull.

1.
July 30, 2012

It's the HMHS TJITJALENGKA.

Best regards,
Morten Merstrand
Denmark

 
An unidentified Royal Navy cruiser.



Close-up of the superstructure.



Close-up of the superstructure of HMS Danae, note the crest is different from the mystery ship.



HMS Dauntless, date unknown.



Close-up of the superstructure of HMS Dauntless, the crest appears to be similar.


4.
July 29, 2012

It is a Ceres class light cruiser. In addition to the other contributors' findings, note that the Danae class has double starboard anchors while the mystery photo shows only one. Photos of HMS Ceres shows only one starboard anchor.

Respectfully,
Creig Miller
Port Neches, Texas


3.
July 28, 2012

I think the new mystery ship is the cruiser (not destroyer!) HMS DANAE but might be DAUNTLESS after the original hanger in the forward house was removed). Those did not have the raised focsle "trawler bow" like most of the other Ds.

Revision:
I now think she is a C not a D. The scuttle count and spacing does not work for a D. and it does for a C. Also the gun director rangefinder is on the middle level below the bridge in a C same as the mystery pic. So I now think it is a C. Jane's says the earlier Cs did not get a trawler bow so that means the five ships of the CERES class


Barry Lake


2.
July 26, 2012

Try either the Capetown (1919), Colombo (1918), Carfiff (ex Caprice) (1917) or Ceres (1917).  JFS 1939 has a picture of Colombo which is a near exactness having in mind modifications, etc.  Location could be Malta.

Philip J. Heydon, I.S.M.


1.
July 26, 2012

Picture one looks like HMS Frobisher, heavy cruiser.

Al Zorn

Submitted by Malcolm Lindsay the ship is flying the German flag, but appears to have been drastically modified from her original appearance.


July 17, 2012

This is the Panzerfregatte (armored frigate) SMS König Wilhelm.

Respectfully,
Creig Miller

 
A photo submitted by Alexander Monreal shows a passenger steamer, probably a transport, seen from a battleship. The steamer has the number 16 on her hull.

Reply 1
Jan. 11, 2012

S/S BAVARIAN of the Allen line, Transport No 16 in the Boer War.

Barry Lake

 
Looks like a destroyer that has been converted into an anti-aircraft picket ship. Any help in identifying this vessel would be a big help.



Reply 1
Nov. 9, 2011

The name of the mystery ship is HMS Adventure, a minelayer completed in 1927. The photo was probably taken in 1943 before her conversion to a repair ship in 1944.

All the best and keep up the excellent work,
Monty Mills


Reply 2
Nov. 9, 2011

Looks to me like a cruiser of D (Danae) class converted to AA ship. The whole superstructure is like a D class. The problem is that only HMS Delhi was converted and armed with American 5 inch guns and fore guns were shielded. The cruiser on the photo has no shielded guns as far as I can see. Other possibility is that she is a cruiser of C class and at last she can be the HMS Adventure, a minelaying cruiser, built 1924.

Vladimir Tarnovski


Reply 3
Nov. 9, 2011

I don't know whether the following is of any help, you probably know the following the HACS gunnery control system makes it a WW2 era ship using British armaments. It clearly has a primary AA role (I don't think it is one of the amphibious warfare conversions) the configuration does not match any of the C class cruiser conversions as there appears to be 3  4 turrets aft. The UK fitted out the Jacob van Heemskerck with UK weapons but this ship is smaller and had I think only 1 funnel. Several Polish destroyers were re-fitted but this ship looks far larger than a destroyer. Several merchant men were re-fitted as fleet support auxiliaries but I can't remember any having this scale of armament. None of the designed auxiliaries  Adamant, Tyne etc had 3 turrets aft so I don't think it is one of these. I think the most likely answer is, it is one of auxiliary AA ships, the Canadian Prince class. The only other AA ships with 4 * 4 turrets were the  Alynbank, Springbank and Foylebank which appear to have 2 turrets forward and aft.

Thank you for an excellent and informative web site,
Chris Parker


Reply 3
Nov. 9, 2011

Looks like ADVENTURE --big clue is the forward funnel is the thin one unlike the Cs and Ds where the forward funnel is the fat one.

Regards,
Barry Lake


Reply 4
Nov. 9, 2011

The mystery picket ship looks a bit like a British "D" Class cruiser although the stacks appear somewhat different as well as their spacing behind the tripod mast.

Creig Miller
Port Neches, Texas
USA

A little out of the normal, I received this photo of a radio controlled ship model from a guy who says
he bought it from an old man and has no other info on it. He thinks it might possibly be a Russian nuclear
powered ship but would like a name so he can finish the model. Any help would be appreciated.
(There have been 2 guesses that the ship is the Savannah but this is incorrect)


Reply 1
June 11, 2008

In response to your question to the name of the ship displayed, I believe it to be the OTTO HAHN. A ship from the former GDR.
Hope this helps,

Leo ter Linden
The Netherlands



Reply 2
Apr. 11, 2009

Am inclined to think the model is that of a mythical whimsey. The superstructure looks as though it is 4 deck levels high, yet is hardly any higher than the hull, which clearly shows only 2 levels via portholes. The hull itself is too low to the waterline to be much more that 2 levels as well.

There seems to be no sense of scale, as the forward bulwark, usually only about four feet high, is almost as high as the first level of superstructure. If the hull is supposed to be four levels, the portholes are way too large, as is the recess for the anchor. Both work reasonably well for a two level hull, which brings us back to the comment above. The presence of what looks like a streamlined diesel type stack cancels the nuclear power idea.

Hoyt Bowman